SCAM WORKS. I’VE TOLD YOU THIS BEFORE. IT IS NOT FOR SCAMMERS TO CAPITALIZE ON EVENTS AND THEY’RE DOING IT RIGHT NOW. AGAIN, THE FEDERAL STUDENT LOAN FORGIVENESS PROGRAM. HERE’S HOW THIS CURRENT SCAM WORKS. YOU GET A CALL FROM SOMEONE CLAIMING TO BE A PART OF THE PROGRAM PROMISING THEY CAN HELP YOU SECURE TENS THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS IN LOAN FORGIVENESS. AND IN THIS CASE, THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU SAYS THE CALLERS HAVE A CONVINCING OF PERSONAL INFORMATION. IN FACT ONE PERSON TOLD THE BEEB, THE CALLER HAD HIS EMAIL ADDRESS. COLLEGE AND THE LAST FOUR DIGITS OF HIS SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER IN MOST VERSIONS OF THIS SCAM, THE CALLER INSISTS THAT YOU NEED TO PAY THEM AN INITIAL FEE, FOLLOWED BY MORE PAYMENTS. SO WHAT DO YOU DO IN THIS CASE? WELL, FIRST OF ALL, YOU CONTACT THE GOVERNMENT AGENCY DIRECTLY. IF YOU RECEIVE A MESSAGE THAT SEEMS LEGITIMATE, BUT YOU AREN’T SURE ABOUT IT. STOP COMMUNICATING WITH THE PERSON WHO CONTACTED YOU. FOR DETAILS ON THE PROGRAM. GO TO ID DOT GOV OR. STUDENT AID DOT GOV. SECOND OF ALL, NEVER PAY FEES FOR A FREE GOVERNMENT PROGRAM. CONSIDER THIS MAY SAY THE FEE WILL GET YOUR RELIEF FASTER OR MAY UNLOCK ADDITIONAL BENEFITS, BUT THAT IS ALL PART OF THEIR SCAM. REMEMBER IF YOU CAN SPOT A SCAM, YOU CAN STOP A SCAM. I’M BRIAN RO

Scammers try to take advantage of people applying for student loan forgiveness

It’s not unusual for scammers to capitalize on current events, and they’re doing it with the federal student loan forgiveness program.How the scam worksYou get a call from someone claiming to be a part of the program and promising they can help you secure tens of thousands of dollars in loan forgiveness.The Better Business Bureau says the callers often have a convincing amount of information. One target reported that the caller had his email address, college name and the last four digits of his Social Security number.In most versions of this scam, the caller insists you need to pay them an initial fee followed by more payments.What should you do?Contact the government agency directly. if you receive a message that seems legitimate, but you aren’t sure, stop communicating with the person who contacted you. For details on the program, go to ed.gov or studentaid.gov.Never pay fees for a free government program. Con artists may say the fee will get you relief faster or will unlock additional benefits, but that is all part of the scam.Video below: Scammers target borrowers.

It’s not unusual for scammers to capitalize on current events, and they’re doing it with the federal student loan forgiveness program.

How the scam works

You get a call from someone claiming to be a part of the program and promising they can help you secure tens of thousands of dollars in loan forgiveness.

The Better Business Bureau says the callers often have a convincing amount of information. One target reported that the caller had his email address, college name and the last four digits of his Social Security number.

In most versions of this scam, the caller insists you need to pay them an initial fee followed by more payments.

What should you do?

Contact the government agency directly. if you receive a message that seems legitimate, but you aren’t sure, stop communicating with the person who contacted you.

For details on the program, go to ed.gov or studentaid.gov.

Never pay fees for a free government program. Con artists may say the fee will get you relief faster or will unlock additional benefits, but that is all part of the scam.

Video below: Scammers target borrowers.